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Roland MDX-40X Desktop CNC Milling Machine

Roland Desktop CNC Milling Machine

Overview

The Roland Mill can be used for engraving and rapid prototyping for material such as wood, foam, plastics and wax (not metal material). The training on how to use the Roland mill is a good introduction to the theory of how to used the Manual Mill in Machine tool area.

Software

There are 6 associated software packages that can be used with the Roland mill.

VPanel - This is a dedicated software for controlling this machine.

ClickMILL - This software is useful for simple cuts e.g pockets, surface levelling and chamfers.

SRP Player - This is a software that imports general-use 3D data, DXF (3D), or STL, and outputs tool paths to the machine. Can cut out designs that could be 3D printed.

3D Engrave - This software is for designing and engraving reliefs (raised engravings), supporting flat engraving.

Dr. Engrave - This is a software for engraving text and shapes.  It also comes with its own stroke fonts.

Virtual MODELA (for 3D Engrave) - This software is for performing simulations before you actually carry out cutting using 3D Engrave. this is used in conjunction with 3D Engrave. 

Training

Two hour training sessions are now available in the Dyson centre, in the training session the student will be shown how to change the tools in the Roland mill and use the software listed above. 

Get in touch and let us know if you would like to be involved with this machine, or are thinking you would like to use this machine.

Please email the Dyson centre to arrange a time and day of the training session engdyman@eng.cam.ac.uk.

Link to internal resources (Raven logon).

RLR20 (Rich), 30 March 2016

“A modern workspace where engineering students can come together outside of the classroom to think, experiment, design, build and exchange ideas.”

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The Engineering Department are delighted to announce a major refurbishment project taking place in the Summer of 2015. 

£2M donation from the James Dyson Foundation, a £2.65M investment from the Higher Education Funding Council for England and £0.6M from the University of Cambridge will allow us to transform the workshop and library facilities for hands-on learning, access to information, and the encouragement of creativity and innovation.